Top 3 Woodworking Projects for 2016

The New Year is here and we’re kicking it off by sharing our top 3 woodworking and clock projects from last year. We have a wide variety of customers at different skill levels, and our top 3 projects are proof of that! Continue reading

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Grandfather Clock Build: The Reveal!

Randy Sharp from Sawdust Inn recently finished his first grandfather clock! It may have took a little longer than Randy had hoped, but he did a fantastic job on one of the most important stages of a clock build…the finishing.

Instead of staining his project, Randy wanted the naturally dark cherry color of the wood to shine through. So he began by sanding all the parts with finer courses of sandpaper, finishing with a hand-sanding to 220 grit paper.

Then he helped the aging process by exposing the clock assembly to the UV rays of direct sunlight. Thanks to two sunny days, the cherry was noticeably darker! Randy then added a generous coat of Boiled Linseed Oil to help move it towards a rich golden brown. Last but not least, he finished it off with three coats of polyurethane for long-lasting protection. As nature takes it course, the clock will eventually reach a rich, deep crimson red.

Here’s a sneak peek of his finished project! See the full reveal here.

Randy Sharp grandfather clock build

Columbia Grandfather Clock Build by Randy Sharp, Sawdust Inn

In Randy Sharp’s 12 years of hobby woodworking at the Sawdust Inn, there have only been two dream projects on his bucket list: a full-sized roll top desk and an heirloom grandfather clock.

Randy recently finished up the roll top desk and it turned out great!

Roll Top Desk by Randy Sharp

He’s now moving onto a grandfather clock build, specifically the Columbia grandfather clock from our popular Cooper Collection of woodworking plans. Randy believes one of the most elegant pieces of furniture to occupy a home is the grandfather clock. And we agree! We’re excited to follow him through the process of handcrafting more than 80 pieces out of hand-selected cherry wood.

Columbia Grandfather Clock build by Randy Sharp

Randy is going to create a series of blog posts and short how-to videos on the grandfather clock build. We invite you to follow along and get an inside look at the detailed craftsmanship required to finish this advanced clock project.

Stay tuned for the first major step in the build – constructing the main frame of the grandfather clock, which requires a first-time woodworking technique for Randy!

Click here to see more on the blog at Sawdustinn.com!

When Time Began: A History of Timekeeping

Chronometry, has become a centuries-old race to develop better and more accurate ways of answering the question, What time is it? Continue reading

Project Delaware: The Grandmother Clock That Almost Wasn’t…

I was posed with a question this last weekend that took me by surprise. I was enjoying some time catching up with old friends who were curious about what I have been up to in regard to work and home life.

As I began to talk about recent projects at work, I showed them some elevation drawings of a new Grandmother clock design, which I have spent the last three months developing. After showing them my intended design, I was asked what the difference between a grandmother clock and grandfather clock was.

Growing up, my own Grandmother’s pride and joy was her Montgomery Ward Grandmother clock, which she purchased in the late 1960’s. It sat at the edge of her living room, graciously welcoming visitors from the entryway hall just after they entered the front door. The clock featured a tapered waist cabinet section, which made the clock resemble that of an hourglass shape.

To my grandmother’s humble credit, this was the distinguishing characteristic of the “grandmother clock” namesake. Consequentially, this was the impression I have had for several years. I had no idea how wrong I was…

Historically Speaking…

Grandmother clock cases are described as tall case clocks or floor clocks, which are smaller than 6-1/2 feet in height. Let’s not confuse these with Granddaughter clocks, which are even smaller versions of floor clocks (usually no larger than 5 feet in height).

Oddly enough, this is the farthest historical descriptions go. This means that Grandfather clocks can certainly have a tapered waist, but will still be classified as a Grandfather style clock providing the clock is over 6-1/2 feet in height. Grandmother style clocks, in turn, can certainly have a straight waist section (and straight case design) providing the clock case is less than 6-1/2 feet tall (and over 5 feet tall). In summary, the shape of a clock has no bearing on a clock’s type. Instead, designation is simply a matter of height, and nothing more.

Grandmother or Grandfather?

delaware-clock-grandmotherYou might ask, where does this leave my latest project? Can it, in fact, still be called a Grandmother clock with this new revelation?

I must admit that I returned after the long holiday weekend on Tuesday with reservations. I am, however, happy to report that it can. Despite the shape of the clock being that which many might associate with a “Grandmother clock” shape, I am happy to report that it will fit the current technical classification agreed upon by many clock experts and historians. With a total designed height of 75-3/8”, this assembly will just make the “cut-off” for being classified as a true Grandmother clock.

Curious about “Project Delaware”? Find out more in the coming months right here on the Klockit Blog!

Written By: Chris Akright

Chris is responsible for the kit, plan, and finishing technical support, which he has provided to Klockit customers for over 14 years. Chris also contributes new product designs, composes written/illustrated assembly manuals, and works to develop new kit and plan products for the Klockit catalog. Chris’s experience is the culmination of years of training under his mentor, and Klockit Designer, John Cooper.