How To: Choose the Right Push-on Clock Movement for Your Project

Do you need help selecting a push-on clock movement for your next project? If so, then you’ve come to the right place! Continue reading

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Top 10 FAQs: Mechanical Clock Movements

Mechanical clock movements can be tricky. From mounting to pendulum use, here’s a list of the 10 most frequently asked questions about mechanical movements and their answers. Continue reading

Product Review: Young Town Push-On Quartz Clock Movement

This Young Town push-on clock movement is one of the newest movements to Klockit’s line of quartz clock movements. It’s a precise motor that’s easy to assemble with hands and has a neat design. Read the review below to find out how this quartz clock movement works, what its most notable features are, and who should buy it.

Young Town Push On Movement

Push On – Is It That Easy?

The answer is YES! It really is that easy. Simply push on the hour and minute clock hands, and then press on the cap pin or second hand. You’ll like that there’s no tiny thru nut to thread on the movement’s shaft to hold the minute hand on.

Notable Features:

This push-on clock movement is easy to install – but that’s not the only thing you’ll enjoy! Young Town has been making clock movements on precision machinery imported from Switzerland and Germany for nearly 39 years. You’ll have peace of mind knowing you purchased a quality clock movement.

We also enjoyed the design of this movement because it allows you to see the moving gears through the movement’s back.

Back - Young Town Clock Movement

Who Should Buy It?

After thoroughly testing and working with this clock movement, I would highly recommend it to anyone who is looking for a quality quartz clock movement that’s easy to integrate with their clock project. At just $3.99, the price is right for this clock movement. Makes a great replacement for existing or outdated clock motors!

Available now at Klockit.com:
www.klockit.com/products/sku-10015.html

Interested in a movement that updates itself? Check out our atomic clock movements and Set & Forget clock movements!

Written By: Rachel Hicks

Rachel is part of the Klockit committee responsible for finding and researching new products. She has helped review many items in order to understand what makes a great product for all of our Klockit customers.

How To: Assemble a Quartz Clock Movement, Dial, and Hands Together

Have a clock with an old clock movement that has quit? Worried that you need to be a technical genius to change out the movement? Fear not! Allow us to show you just how easy it is to assemble a quartz clock movement. But before we go through the steps for mounting a new movement, let’s take some time to identify the key sections of the clock movement.

All quartz clock movements have a center hand shaft which is responsible for driving the clock hands for proper timekeeping. The center shaft is composed of sections: The threaded bushing; the hour hand shaft; the minute hand shaft; and second hand pin shaft. Note that the illustration is generalized (as some center shafts may not have a threaded bushing, and some minute hand shafts will vary from that which is shown). We will touch upon these oddities briefly within the assembly steps and illustrations below. With some terminology under your belt, it is time to dive into assembly.

Quartz Clock Movement Assembly

Step One

Place the rubber gasket over the center shaft of the quartz clock movement. Helpful Hint: The rubber gasket can be omitted if the need should be, more on this later.

Step One

Step Two

Insert the center shaft of the clock movement through the center hole of the clock face (dial) as shown. The battery compartment should be at the bottom (see back view). Helpful Hint: Some faces may be mounted to a board called a dial mounting board/panel. If so, you will need to determine the combined thickness of the dial board and clock face in order to select a clock movement that has the appropriate maximum dial thickness for the threaded bushing of the center hand shaft.

Step Two

Step Three

A portion of the threaded bushing of the center hand shaft should stick out through the front surface of the clock face (this does not apply to movements without a threaded bushing – more on that in a moment). Place the washer over the center hand shaft as shown. Washers are not typically used for movements without a threaded bushing.

Step Three

 

Step Four

The hex nut can be threaded onto the remaining threaded bushing which protrudes from the front of the dial face. A minimum of 3/32” (just under 1/8”) of threading is required to secure the hex nut. If you do not have enough threading sticking through the front of the clock face, try omitting the rubber gasket. If you still require additional threading, you may also remove the washer. The hex nut should be hand tightened + . turn. It is important not to over-tighten the hex nut (as it can actually restrict proper timekeeping if too tight).Step Four

Helpful Hint: Do NOT attempt to over-tighten the hex nut if the movement should want to pivot/rotate. Consider, instead, small dabs of hot glue overlapping the back of the clock face and each side of the movement to keep it from rotating.

NOTE: Clock movements with no threaded bushing will not include a hex nut, and will need to be secured by other means (double-stick tape or a couple dabs of hot glue work really well).

Step Five

The shorter hour hand can be pushed onto the hour hand shaft. Most hour hands feature a “sliced” mounting hub so that the hub can spread slightly for a tight friction fit. For most clock movements, the hour hand will be mounted at the 12 o’clock position (check chiming movement instructions for possible exceptions to this rule).

Helpful Hint: If the hour hand should be hard to mount, consider spreading the hub slightly. A small bend adjustment can widen the mount hole, but make certain to bend in small increments. Inversely, the center mount hole can also be decreased (if need be) by slightly bending the hub flanges (at the slice of the hub) closer together.

Step Five

Step Six

Mount the longer minute hand. For many quartz clock movements, the mount hole should be oval in shape (however, push-on minute hands will have a circular mount hub, similar to the hour hand but smaller in diameter).

In most cases, the minute hand should also point at the 12 position (once again, chiming movements may prove the exception). If it is not pointing to the 12, rotate the minute hand clock-wise to the 12 position. When adjusting the minute hand, you may find that the hour hand may move from 12. If need be, you can pull off the hour hand and re-mount it so that it points to 12.

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Step Seven

Skip this step and go to step 8 if you plan to use a second sweep hand on your clock.

With the minute hand mounted, secure the hand with the cap nut provided. The cap nut simply threads onto the end of the minute hand shaft. Helpful Hint: Push-on minute hands may not require a cap nut to secure the hand (as a push-on minute hand is a friction fit, like the hour hand). Take a moment to use the time-set knob to rotate the hands to ensure they have proper clearance with each other. Also make certain the hands are not touching the clock (dial) face. If there is a glass panel in your clock case, ensure that the cap nut is not touching against the inside surface of the glass.

Step Seven

Step Eight

Proceed with use of the open nut only if you plan to use a second sweep hand. Thread the open nut onto the end of the minute hand shaft to secure the minute hand. Helpful Hint: Push-on minute hands may not require an open nut to secure the hand (as a push-on minute hand is a friction fit, like the hour hand). The stem on the back surface of the second hand can be slipped onto the second hand pin shaft (located in the end of the center hand shaft). Press the second hand on so that it points to the 12 position (as with the other hands mounted previously).

Take a moment to use the time-set knob to rotate the hands to ensure they have proper clearance with each other. Also make certain the hands are not touching the clock (dial) face. If there is a glass panel in your clock case, ensure that the second hand hub is not touching against the inside surface of the glass.

Step Eight

Last But Not Least…

Congratulations! You have successfully mounted your quartz clock movement. See, we told you it would be easy. Generally speaking, all that remains is to insert the battery (or batteries) and set the time (noting that chiming movements include specific instructions for synchronizing the chimes with the time).

Just a couple of additional notes: Keep in mind that disassembly of any quartz clock movement will reflect the preceding assembly steps in reverse. Also, if you use hot glue to additionally secure the movement, use hot glue sparingly. Only a couple of dabs overlapping each side of the movement and dial back are necessary, as the movement should be able to be removed if ever the need should be.

Written By: Chris Akright

Chris is responsible for the kit, plan, and finishing technical support, which he has provided to Klockit customers for over 15 years. Chris also contributes new product designs, composes written and illustrated assembly manuals, and works to develop new kit and plan products for the Klockit catalog. Chris’s experience is the culmination of years of training under his mentor, and Klockit Designer, John Cooper.

Product Review: Quartex® High Torque, Set & Forget, 3 Battery Pack Quartz Clock Movement

The Quartex® High Torque, Set & Forget, 3 Battery Pack Movement is the latest edition to Klockit’s line of quartz clock movements. It’s a 3-in-1 clock movement that’s powerful, smart, and long lasting. Read the review below to find out how this clock movement works, what its most notable features are, and who should buy it.

14161

Equipped With Power

14161-3This new clock movement is equipped with High Torque power, which means it is capable of running the longest clock hands on the market today. We recommend using our extra long clock hands with this movement – choose from 8” to 17 ½” hands in various styles to complement your clock’s style.

Set & Forget – Is it really that easy?

The answer is YES! It really is that easy. Simply select your time zone on the back of this clock movement, and the correct time and date are automatically displayed. You will never have to adjust the time settings on your clock when your movement is powered by our patented Set & Forget technology.

Inside this quartz clock movement, you’ll find a microchip “calendar” that is preprogrammed with the date and time until 2030. The microchip calendar enables the clock movement to automatically spring forward and fall back at Daylight Saving Time without a radio controlled signal.

In the fall, you’ll notice the clock movement will move the hands forward 11 hours at an accelerated speed to achieve a set back of one hour. In the spring, the movement will move the hands forward one hour at an accelerated speed to achieve the advance of one hour.

If you like the fact that you won’t have to update the time of your clock until 2030 with this motor, you’ll also enjoy this movement’s next notable feature.

Long Lasting Power

14161-2This new clock movement features long lasting power, thanks to its extended life battery pack. Simply insert three AA batteries to give this movement power to run up to five years. Trust us, you’ll enjoy the convenience of not having to take down your wall clock for five years!

Who Should Buy It?

After testing and working with this clock movement, I would highly recommend it to anyone who is creating a large wall clock or looking for a low maintenance clock movement. At just $13.25, the price is right for this movement. It’s easy to assemble and use in clock projects, and offers long-lasting power and smart technology.

Available now at Klockit.com:

www.klockit.com/products/sku-14161.html

Written By: Rachel Hicks

Rachel is part of the Klockit committee responsible for finding and researching new products. She has helped review many items in order to understand what makes a great product for all of our Klockit customers.

FAQ: Mechanical Clock Movements

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This post will cover frequently asked questions and their answers about mechanical clock movements. If you question isn’t listed in the post below, leave us a comment and we’ll make sure to answer it. Let’s get started!

QUESTION: My clock chimes 5 minutes early/late on the quarter hour chimes. How do I fix this?

ANSWER: When the clock is chiming, remove the minute hand from the clock. On the back of the hand is a bushing. With a pair of pliers turn the bushing on the back of the hand so that when the hand is put back on, it’s pointing directly at the number 3, 6, 9 or 12. Make sure you don’t turn anything on the hand shaft while doing this.

QUESTION: The hand nut falls off and if I tighten it down, it stops the clock. What can I do?

ANSWER: Remove the hand nut and minute hand from the clock. Then check the hour hand to ensure it’s pushed far enough next to the dial that at least 1/8″ of the brass shaft it is on is coming through the top of the hour hand. Do not count the threaded part at the tip of the shaft as part of the 1/8″.

Once you have the hour hand in the correct position, you can put the minute hand and nut back on. If the hour hand is too tight to go on any further, remove the hour hand and file out a small amount of the hole on the hour hand. There may be excess paint in the hole making it too small to fit correctly. Be careful not to file too much out of the hour hand; it still needs to be a snug fit.

QUESTION: Why does the middle weight drop faster than the outer two?

ANSWER: There could be several reasons why this is happening. Let us ask you this: are the chimes ever turned off? If so, when the chimes are off, the two outside weights do not move down until the chimes are turned back on.

It could also be that there may be something wrong inside the clock movement. In that case, you will need to talk to a mechanical technician. Klockit’s mechanical technician can be reached at 1-800-556-6474.

QUESTION: What does each of the weights do?

ANSWER: The left weight (as you are standing in front of the clock) runs the hour strike. The center weight runs the time and pendulum. The right weight runs the 15 minute melodies. This is also true for wind up clock movements.

QUESTION: I have a mechanical clock movement reads ’94cm’ on the back, but I want to use a longer pendulum. Is this possible?

ANSWER: Unfortunately not. If you put a 114cm long pendulum on a clock that is meant to take a 94cm pendulum, it will run hours slow by a day and won’t keep accurate time. It’s the same as if you were to put a short pendulum on a movement that needs a long pendulum; it would run too fast.

QUESTION: Where does the heaviest weight go?

ANSWER: On the right-hand side as you face the front of the clock. This is true for all of the Hermle mechanical clock movements we carry. However, the Kieninger 13049 places the heaviest weight in the center because it features an automatic sequence option.

Mechanical Clock Movement Maintenance

If you have invested in an authentic mechanical-style clock movement, it is important to understand regular maintenance will be involved to protect your investment and ensure that it will work for years to come. If you have just purchased and received your mechanical clock movement, it will be factory-oiled and ready to run right out of the box (after mounting and adjustments, of course). Eventually, however, the clock movement will require a bit of upkeep.

How To Clean Your Clock Movement

Clock movements should be cleaned every 3 to 5 years. To clean your clock movement, you will need mineral spirits, clean cloths (soft and lint-free), and small artist brushes.  Use the minerals spirits and small brushes to clean away all dirt, grime, and old oil. Wipe brushes often on a clean cloth so that you are not re-applying dirt/grime to the movement. Wipe away excess mineral spirits and allow enough time for any remaining mineral spirits to completely evaporate.  Once the movement is dry, proceed to lubricate the movement.

cleaning-prod

Oiling Your Clock Movement’s Bearings

Would you run your car without any oil in it? You could, but we all understand that eventual damage will occur to the engine. The same holds true for a mechanical clock movement. Bearing points require a drop of lubrication to keep everything running smoothly. Bearings devoid of oil are subject to excessive friction which can eventually lead to expensive repairs or the need for movement replacement. As a rule of thumb, mechanical movements should be lubricated every 1 to 3 years – once every year in drier climates.

How To:

Generally speaking, oil all bearing surfaces which rotate against each other.  Grease surfaces which slide against each other. Here are some tips to keep in mind when oiling your clock movement:

dodont

Lubrication is not the only aspect of maintenance that is important.  As clock oil ages, it can become tacky. Also, oil will collect dust over time. When the dust mixes with oil, it forms an abrasive grime which can quickly wear away at bearings and such.  This is why it is particularly important to clean the movement at intervals in between oiling.

Should You Have a Professional Inspect Your Clock Movement?

While cleaning and oiling your own movement can save you some money, it is still a good idea to have the movement professionally cleaned and oiled every once in a while.  For example, there are some points that may only be oiled while the clock movement is disassembled.  Above all, a qualified professional has the ability to completely clean the movement beyond novice capabilities and can inspect the movement for any signs of wear as they do so.

Written By: Chris Akright

Chris is responsible for the kit, plan, and finishing technical support, which he has provided to Klockit customers for over 13 years. Chris also contributes new product designs, composes written/illustrated assembly manuals, and works to develop new kit and plan products for the Klockit catalog. Chris’s experience is the culmination of years of training under his mentor, and Klockit Designer, John Cooper.